#FlatoutIsMyCanvas (1)

Snacking For The Picky Eater: #FlatoutIsMyCanvas

Eating healthy can be a challenge. Not just for us, as adults, but for kids, too. I don’t know how it works in your house, but in ours, Sophia is the pickiest eater I have ever met. Well, expect for me as a kid (and well into adulthood), that is. She has her few foods that we know she will eat and not fight us over. The standard kid stuff: chicken nuggets, pizza, mac & cheese, hot dogs, etc. So, trying to get her to try new things has been a bit of a challenge. Maddie, on the other hand? That girl will eat anything we give her and ALWAYS wants to try something new.

As you can see, with these two, meal time can be a challenge. Heck, even snack time can be tough. We’ve seen what happens when we give them sweet or salty snacks to hold them over between meals. They crash really hard in a short amount of time. Which is tough when there are things we need to get done. Sophia has ballet class and needs to have her energy up for that. Plus, she’s in Pre-K now, so homework has to get done after school. YES HOMEWORK IN PRE-K.

So, with the help of Flatout Flatbread, we started trying to come up with some healthy snack ideas that maybe, just maybe would appeal to Sophia–even at her most picky. First, we thought if we she at least got in the kitchen with us and helped make her own food, it would help her at least want to try something. Second, we thought of ingredients that she liked on their own and figured out a way to combine them that she would like.

So, we came up with these tasty little Apple Peanut Butter Rollups. Check out the recipe and instructions below the image.



  • 1 Flatout Light Original flatbread
  • 1 small apple (flavor of choice)
  • Peanut butter


  • Lay flatbread flat and spread peanut butter generously 
  • Dice apple into small 1″ squares
  • Lay apple squares into two lines, a quarter of the way in from each end 
  • Roll flatbread from one end to the next
  • Cut into six pieces

That’s it. It’s pretty simple and was really tasty. Sophia actually loved them and gave them a thumbs up. Plus, she had an absolute blast putting them together.


You can see that Flatout breads are a great blank canvas in the kitchen and the possibilities are virtually endless. So, grab some Flatout flatbreads, grab your kids, and get in the kitchen and start creating the perfect food masterpiece. Maybe Don’t try to hang these on your fridge though… Remember, #FlatoutIsMyCanvas!

To find a store near you that carries Flatout, visit the store locator:  and try a $.50 off coupon.

If you want some more  delicious recipe ideas, check out the Flatout Facebook page to see what they–and other bloggers–have come up with.

**I was compensated by Flatout Flatbread for this post, however the recipe and views are our own**


There Goes My Hero–No, MINE!

Stop me if you’ve seen or heard this scene unfold:

*Toys strewn about on the floor. Your kids playing quietly next to each other. Then it happens. They both reach FOR THE SAME TOY*

“No, that is MINE. It’s for BIG kids, like me. You can’t play with it!”

*Insert crying kid here*

Sound familiar? Of course it does. Aside from the fact that IT IS MY LIFE right now. Ok, it’s my life all the time. It also WAS my life growing up. What, that’s impossible, you say. Nick, I’m sure you and your siblings got along famously and shared toys like little angels… To which I reply: Have you met the Browne siblings??? Perhaps you haven’t. But, many times, it was like Mad Max in our basement. You give me that toy RIGHT NOW OR ELSE. Tiny kid rumbles ensue. Really pleasant memories here, you guys.

Need more examples? Of course you do. I don’t recall the year. But, I was a kid. It was Christmas Day. In our family, for a long time, we didn’t unwrap presents. They were laid out in individual piles, unwrapped. So, as soon as we would come down the stairs and turn towards the living room, we would see just what presents we had received. One year, a toy that I REALLY wanted and asked for specifically was in my brother’s pile of gifts. And I threw a fit. Why? Because it was on my list. Duh.


It was MY toy. I asked for it. I wanted it. It should have been for me, right? Talk about ungrateful… I deserved a worse punishment than I received. That’s the honest to goodness truth. I shouldn’t have thrown a fit, I knew eventually my brother would share with me. And he did. Like, that day. Lesson learned (for a day).

Fast-forward to today where I’m the parent. Sophia and Maddie are at the ages where they both like the same toys, but Maddie isn’t quite up-to-speed with how to handle all the toys that Sophia plays with. But, she still wants to play with them anyway. So, they fight over them. Tears. Screams. SO MANY TEARS.

Honestly, as a way to remedy this, we have been looking for toys they can both play with. Together. Let them team up sometimes. You know how in the Marvel Avengers movies, they bring the characters together to fight as a team, but then they spin off into their own independent franchises, as well? That’s what we’re looking for here. Play with each other some of the time. Other times, be the hero on your own. Makes sense, right? Well I thought so…

And, something that can give Maddie the experience of playing with toys that may not be in her age-range but she can still get enjoyment out of. Plus, if we get them the same toys, that kinda sorta maybe saves us some money. So, that’s a win, too, right? Right.

Quite honestly, that is one of the reasons that we loved the PLAYSKOOL HEROES product line. For Sophia, it lets her play with toys that are meant for her age, while also letting her play with some characters that she’s just starting to understand. Like Iron Man and Transformers Rescue Bots. Plus, who doesn’t love the Tyrannosaurus Rex from Jurassic World?


For Maddie, who has no idea who these characters are, it just gives her the chance to scream “RAWRRRRR!!!” and have the T-Rex eat Iron man because, well, reasons.  It’s just good fun for both of them.

Check out more on the totally and awesomely fun line below.

Marvel Super Here Adventures Iron Man Armor Fortress Playset

Geared for kids ages 3-7, this set lets kids unleash their inner-Tony Stark. They can re-enact favorite movie scenes or create their own!


Transformers Rescue Bots High Tide Playset

Geared towards kids ages 3-7, this set was inspired by the hit animated TV series TRANSFORMERS RESCUE BOTS. This set is definitely more than meets the eye.


Jurassic World Tyrannosaurus Rex

Geared towards kids ages 3 and up, the Jurassic World playset lets little hands get a handle on big-kid toys. Complete with a T-Rex that growls and gobbles with sweet light-up eyes and head-chomping action, kids can unleash their inner beast.


For even more #PlayskoolHeroes action, follow Hasbro on all of their social channels:

Instagram: @Hasbro

Twitter: @HasbroNews

Facebook: Facebook.com/Playskool

*Thanks to Playskool Heroes, who compensated me for this post, for letting me re-live some traumatic toy-related memories*


Do You Wanna Play Repeat?


We’ve all been there. Hanging out with a sibling, or a friend, or that random dude at the bus stop that won’t stop talking to you because reasons–and they start with “hey, do you, uh, wanna play repeat??” And you reply, nicely “no, I’m good. I hate that game.” So, you think that’s the end of it, right? Big old bag of NOPE. “No, I’m good. I hate that game.”

You try to back your way out of the game that you very clearly do NOT want to be playing. “Seriously, can we not do this right now?” And because they’re your friend or brother or sister or stranger-du-jour they ignore you “seriously, can we not do this right now?” And on and on and on it goes for a solid 20 minutes. It ends when you either walk away or push them in front of a bus. Whichever is easier.

Why am I talking about one of the most annoying games ever? Well, considering that Sarah and I are currently living through a never-ending game of repeat, it seemed pretty apt. No, Sophia isn’t repeating everything we say. Why would you ask that… No, what is actually happening is that Maddie is learning everything she possibly can from Sophia. And repeating it. Or copying it. Like, every.little.thing. Good, bad, other, if big sister is doing it, you can bet your ass that little sister is following suit.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s great for some things. Like, brushing her teeth. Or going on the swings. Or running around the yard. Or trying something new and different. It’s pretty awesome when she does that stuff. I love it. When she tries repeating words that she so obviously can’t say, it’s beyond adorable. I’m pretty sure Sophia loves it, too. Unless I’m reading things the wrong way when she says “Stop copying me, Maddie!” But, I’m pretty sure that means she’s enjoying it. Right? Right.

Then, there are the things that I wish she wouldn’t be copying. That high-pitched squeal when she’s upset at not getting her way? PLEASE FOR THE LOVE OF GOD DON’T DO IT AGAIN. Throwing herself on the floor for a tantrum, jumping on or off the bed, hitting me because I SO OBVIOUSLY did something wrong (sorrrrrrrrrrry that I said you can’t go sledding down the steps). Those are the times where maybe not repeating every.single.thing Sophia does would be cool. That’s not too much to ask, is it? Oh. Oh, it is? I wasn’t aware of that.

In all honesty, it’s pretty damn funny watching Maddie play repeat all the time. There have been plenty of laugh-out-loud moments and I’m sure those are going to continue. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m gonna go ask that guy over there if he wants to play repeat…

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Call Me a Babysitter One More Time


There’s this notion. This little bit of language that people use when they see a dad out and about with their kids–alone. What is it? It’s the idea that because there is no mother present that the dad is babysitting. Have you run into this situation before?

You’re walking through the mall, or Target, or are at the park with your kids in tow. And a stranger stops you.

“Oh, your kids are so cute. How’s Daddy doing babysitting you?”

Or, you’re out in public and one or all of your kids are having a meltdown. Someone approaches.

“Don’t worry kids, mommy will be back soon.”

It has happened to me. Thankfully it hasn’t happened a ton. But it has happened enough that it pisses me off to no end. I’m sorry? Did you just ask me if I was babysitting MY OWN KIDS?! Walk away. Walk away now.

This isn’t something that was planning on writing about, to be honest. But it’s long been something that annoys the hell out of me. Yesterday I read a post on Scary Mommy that is asserting the same thing that I am–and it really got me thinking about the subject again. Admittedly, I don’t usually care for most of the content that Scary Mommy puts out. But this one? It hit the nail on the head and I was really glad they published it. Dads are not babysitters. We are parents.

Is there somebody else giving me money that I am not aware of to take care of my children? That’s a big bag of nope! If someone wants to give me money, though, that’s cool. I like money.

But Nick, you say, why is it so bad to ask a dad if they are babysitting? They don’t mean anything by it. No. Just no. It doesn’t matter if you aren’t trying to be insulting or aren’t trying to insinuate that I’m less of a parent than my wife. But guess what? That’s exactly what you’re doing. I bust my ass to be the best damn dad I can be to Sophia and Maddie. And I’m damn proud to be their dad. If you haven’t noticed by the things I’ve written or the insane amount of pictures, quotes, and videos that I share of them, being a dad is my life. So, if you want to devalue that by calling me a babysitter, we’re going to have a problem.


That’s Chris Routly from Daddy Doctrines, proudly rocking his shirt from the National At-Home Dad Network. Image courtesy City Dads Group.

Look, I’m not saying that I’m going to explode in your face if you call me a babysitter. But you’ll get a death stare from me and probably a few words that you’ll wish I hadn’t said. Stop perpetuating the archaic stereotype that dads are the lesser of the parents. Guess what? Parenting is typically a team sport. And the team is usually 50/50. So, call me a dad, a father, ask me how my day of parenting my kids is going. Just don’t call me a babysitter. You’re better than that.


Whole-y Crap – Surviving #Whole30

I looked in the mirror. I looked at recent photos. I looked down at my plate. Do you know what I saw? I saw things I didn’t like. I saw the picture of a man that was on his way to being quite round, out-of-shape, and on his way to seeing a steep decline in his health. I saw food that I knew wasn’t going to help me. Food that wasn’t healthy for me. And, I kept eating it. Just as I always did.

I’ve never been what you would call a healthy eater. At all. I ate what I liked and when it came to fruits or veggies, I typically said no thank you, slide me that cheesesteak. I formed terrible habits, like so many of us do. It’s not like I wasn’t aware of them. I just chose to overlook them. Then something finally clicked. It was time for a change.

I watched two of my managers at work go through a month of Whole30. One is probably more of a picky eater than I am, and I watched (while also torturing him with pictures of food he couldn’t eat) him shed weight and look healthier and feel better. Before that, I had never even heard of Whole30. So, while on vacation and in the midst of pigging out and drinking all week, Sarah and I did some research and just said “this is it, we’re doing it. July 1, we make a change.” And, so we did.

Before I jump into what we did and how we changed and how doing it with small, picky kids, I’ll throw a little info your way about just what Whole30 is, straight from the source:

Established by Dallas Hartwig and Melissa Hartwig (of Whole9) in April 2009, the Whole30® is our original nutritional program designed to change your life in 30 days. Think of it as a short-term nutritional reset, designed to help you put an end to unhealthy cravings and habits, restore a healthy metabolism, heal your digestive tract, and balance your immune system.

Certain food groups (like sugar, grains, dairy and legumes) could be having a negative impact on your health and fitness without you even realizing it. Are your energy levels inconsistent or non-existent? Do you have aches and pains that can’t be explained by over-use or injury? Are you having a hard time losing weight no matter how hard you try? Do you have some sort of condition (like skin issues, digestive ailments, seasonal allergies or fertility issues) that medication hasn’t helped? These symptoms may be directly related to the foods you eat—even the “healthy” stuff.

So how do you know if (and how) these foods are affecting you? Strip them from your diet completely. Cut out all the psychologically unhealthy, hormone-unbalancing, gut-disrupting, inflammatory food groups for a full 30 days. Let your body heal and recover from whatever effects those foods may be causing. Push the “reset” button with your metabolism, systemic inflammation, and the downstream effects of the food choices you’ve been making. Learn once and for all how the foods you’ve been eating are actually affecting your day to day life, and your long term health.

Photo courtesy of http://whole30.com/itstartswithfood/

Photo courtesy of Whole30.com

So, now that you know what Whole30 is, let’s jump back into the story. When we started we knew that we were going to be cutting out a ton of foods that we ate normally. I mean, my daily breakfast was a wheat bagel with peanut butter. Later, regular breakfast. And say hello to eggs and sweet potato hash every day.

If you’re looking for recipe ideas, follow Whole30Recipes on Instagram. We also got some great recipes from stupideasypaleo.com–just choose the ones that are Whole30-compliant.

The beginning was really rough. We also chose to start right before 4th of July, which made it extra hard, what with BBQs and drinking and fireworks. But, we stayed the course. We learned all about how to use healthier alternatives to make some absolutely delicious dishes. And, we made probably the best sweet potato chips that have ever been made. Seriously, I want to sell them. That good, people. I ate more fruit than I’ve eaten, probably, ever.

We had our cravings and thoughts of stopping at multiple points. But, we didn’t. I didn’t want to start something and then stop–like I’ve done with so many other things in my life. I set a goal of going the full 30 days. And we did it. That makes me insanely proud.

The long and the short of our journey was that, as you can see in my photo above, I lost weight. I lost abour 15 pounds. Sarah also lost about 15 pounds. We both felt amazing. But, aside from missing some of our old favorite foods every now and then–we also had another struggle. The kids.

Sophia eats very few foods. She’s insanely picky–as is the case with many four-year olds. So, here we were, making them pizza, or chicken nuggets, or a peanut butter sandwich. Or, giving them pretzels or chips, or a cookie or ice cream. All the while, we know we can’t eat them. I will tell you this–it takes A TON of self control to keep from licking the excess peanut butter off a knife after you make a sandwich. Especially if that’s what you’ve done, since, oh I don’t know, forever. It taught me to push away from those foods even more.

I’m not going to sit here and tell you that it was easy. It was far from easy. Changing habits like *that* isn’t a task that you should take on lightly. I say that, and honestly, we didn’t really prepare ourselves. We just jumped in with both feet. When you see the changes in someone else on a daily basis, you want that for yourself. I was tired of looking in pictures and seeing Mr. Fat-Face McGee staring back at me. It’s not like I was brimming with all the confidence in the world, anyway. And seeing that, made it worse. And pushed me to change.

I’m not looking for anyone to say great job to me. What I did, I did for me. I did for my kids, so they don’t have an out-of-shape dad winded any time they want to play. They need me around.

When I posted that photo above to Instagram and also on Facebook, I was absolutely floored at the responses I received. To say it was probably the most engagement I’ve received on anything I’ve posted would be true. An overwhelming amount of support from some people who I don’t talk to that often, if at all. Lots of people wanted to know more about Whole30, what it entailed, the ins and the outs. To which I gladly shared what we learned. What hit me the most were people saying that we inspired them. That they were going to follow our lead. Me–an inspiration. That is not something I take lightly. It’s an honor to hear those words from any one person, let alone more than one. You all made me feel incredible. And I want to say thank you.

I’m not finished. While I may not be on Whole30 right now, that doesn’t mean my journey to being healthy is over. If I eat something that isn’t Whole30-approved, I kind of feel guilty about it. I’m trying to stick to somewhere around 75-80% Whole30-approved diet going forward. While also trying to workout every day if I can. My journey is just beginning.

Have you done #Whole30? What were your experiences like? Favorite food from your time on it? Leave it in the comments, tweet me, or on Facebook!


Sharing My Struggle

11017500_796305033756995_4362691894724985392_nI’m not one to get overly-serious when I write in this space. Do I complain? Yes. Do I bemoan my screaming kids acting like tyrants? Yes, I do that, too. Right now, though, I’m struggling. And I need to get it out.

I’ve written before about feeling like I was failing as a dad. That was after a very long weekend on my own with both girls for the first time–when Maddie was still an infant. It was a tough weekend. I learned a lot from it. It made me stronger. But, right now, I feel like I’m scraping by in my role as a dad.

Perhaps it’s the age that both girls are at right now. Sophia is one of the most strong-willed four-year olds I’ve ever met in my life. And Maddie is right in that terrible twos pipeline, about to turn two next month. But, I feel beaten down. Like I don’t know what I’m doing. Like I’m being overrun by two kids. It feels like my instincts have been wrong on far too many occasions. They act up, misbehave, scream, yell, fight and I go for corrective action–it always feels like I’m doing the wrong thing.

I can feel my blood boil when they don’t listen. My patience dissipates in record time, and I feel like I could snap. I feel like I’m grasping at straws. Nothing works. I read about different techniques, ask for help, and no matter what I do, I feel like it’s wrong. I’ll tell you this much–it sucks. Being filled with self-doubt about the thing that you are most proud to be is heart-wrenching.

I want to be a great dad. I want to be someone that Sophia and Maddie can look up to. I don’t want to be someone they look at and get scared of because they think I’m going to yell. I don’t want to be that person. I don’t want to be that dad. It seems like I’m heading in that direction and I can’t stand it. Maybe I need to look in the mirror and figure some things out, I’m really not sure. But, I feel like I’m failing.

This isn’t some new realization, either. This has been eating at me for some time now. I’ve just been doing what I always do when something is getting to me–push it down a little deeper and hope it eventually stops. It’s not the healthiest way to deal with a feeling, but it’s just what I’ve always done. It’s terrible, honestly. I’m well aware that when something like this is going on, I need to get it out. Talk it out. Get it off my chest, and figure out a solution. I’m not looking for sympathy here or to be told I’m doing just fine. I just need to get this out so that I’m not burying it.

This can’t be something that I let simmer and burn inside of me for a long time. There are too many long-term ramifications to doing that. That’s why I’m writing it out. This is as much for me as it is for anyone else. I know that I’m not the only one out there–mom or dad–that feel like they’re flailing. This is my struggle and I have work to do.

If you’re struggling too, I’d love to hear about it. How do you deal with it? Leave it in the comments, on Facebook, or Twitter.

db no

Oh NO – The “No” Phase Has Begun

A photo posted by @sarie328 on

You guys, we have a problem. My sweet, lovable, nearly two-year old Maddie has discovered the word no. And I don’t mean in the cute kind of way, either.

She already hit and passed that stage. She was an adorable mini-Mutombo. She even had the finger wag down pat. She looked basically just like this:

dikembo gif

And IT.WAS.ADORABLE. She said it all the time. She told Sophia no A LOT. Which was great for us. I mean, it saved us the trouble. We were gonna say no anyway, but having her preempt our no with a no of her own was great. OR, she’d reinforce our no with a no of her own. #Adorbs

But now? This week, HOLY HELL. She wakes up, is happy and running around. But then it’s time to get dressed. Change her diaper. Put on clothes. Brush hair and teeth. It’s then that her inner-Daniel Bryan circa 2012 comes out. What do I mean? Just take a look at the gif below. You’ll get the idea.

db no

Need a more audible illustration? Fine. This oughta do the trick.

Seriously. She just started doing it this week. We’re both just like, “WHAT IS HAPPENING?!” “WHY ARE YOU YELLING AT US?!” It’s a whole thing. I blame Sophia.

I know, I KNOW, it’s just a phase. One that will last probably right through her formative years. Right up until FOREVER. You wanna know how Sarah and I are reacting to this when it happens? Take a gander, dear friends.


tina gif

Or how about this one:

stop it

You catch my drift? It’s OUT OF CONTROL. So, if you’ll excuse me, I need to go start chanting YES! in the face of my soon-to-be two-year-old child…

db yes gifLike this post? Follow me on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram!